Find Fault...In Everything

Date

Jun 30, 2018

Sermon Series

Is it possible that we follow the same path as Hitler when we seek out and discuss the faults of individuals, ministries, and organizations within our Church? Could we possibly be destroying lives (and our church) when we seek to highlight the faults of others?

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Dear Downers Church Family:

Adolf Hitler: one of history’s worst murderers. Several theories have been postulated on why Hitler hated the Jews. Some suggested it was the anti-Semitic political leadership in his hometown of Vienna. Others suggest the possibility of his father’s alleged illegitimate beginnings from a Jewish man. While others believe that Hitler’s main hatred for Jews (and “Bolsheviks”) stemmed from the NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers’ Party), which he joined after WWI.

Historian/journalist Dr. Joachim Riecker, in his book November 9: How World War One Let to the Holocaust, stated that the core of Hitler’s hatred toward Jews was the “defeat of Germany in WW1.” Riecker continues, “Hitler blamed the Jews for the defeat of the country, the collapse of the monarchy and the ruination of millions.” Reicker also claims that Hitler compared the “cancer/blood poison” that killed his mother in 1907 to the “Jewish poison” that killed Germany.

Other historians believe that it was not only the First World War that was a Jewish conspiracy to destroy Germany, but the Treaty of Versailles. The war crumbled the political power of Germany, but the treaty attacked the German economic and geographic landscapes. Hitler, along with other right-wing German parties, believed this to be a Jewish conspiracy with the Allies. It theorized that Hitler’s blaming of the Jews led him to exterminate a people while “taking back” what was stolen from his country.

Historians will never agree to why Hitler tried killing an entire race of people. However, historian will mostly agree that the Jewish people were made a scapegoat for the German failures of before. Hitler, and much of his Nazi party, was convinced that he was making a better nation by eliminating a people whom he believed was at fault for German shortcomings.

Is it possible that we follow the same path as Hitler when we seek out and discuss the faults of individuals, ministries, and organizations within our Church? Could we possibly be destroying lives (and our church) when we seek to highlight the faults of others?

Pastor Kent

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